Kincaid receives 2016 BC Community Achievers Award

Jim Kincaid (second row centre, right behind Lieutenant Governor Judith Guichon’s left shoulder) was one of a group of British Columbians honoured at a ceremony in Victoria last week.

Jim Kincaid (second row centre, right behind Lieutenant Governor Judith Guichon’s left shoulder) was one of a group of British Columbians honoured at a ceremony in Victoria last week.

Trent Ernst, Editor

Jim Kincaid, President of the Tumbler Ridge Museum Foundation, was awarded a 2016 BC Community Achievers Award at a ceremony at Government House in Victoria last week.

Kincaid was one of thirty people named to the list from across the province.

Kincaid, says the release announcing his winning, is “a committed and inspiring voice that has achieved an international presence for the institution he serves. Kincaid also offers the community hope through his efforts as director of the Tumbler Ridge Global Geopark and has been pivotal in transforming the challenges of the local economy.”

Premier Christy Clark announced the awards, along with Keith Mitchell, chair of the BC Achievement Foundation. She says “all British Columbians are inspired by those who lead by example, lending their time and talents in their community.”

Kincaid was selected to receive the award by an independent committee made up of Mayor Henry Braun of the City of Abbotsford, Mayor Carol Leclerc of the City of Terrace and past recipients Victoria Dobbyn of Roberts Creek, Daphne Goode of Victoria and Christopher Seguin of Kamloops.

Kincaid went down to the awards ceremony for a formal presentation ceremony at Government House in Victoria on May 25, 2016. Each recipient received a certificate and a medallion designed by B.C. artist Robert Davidson. “It was an all-expenses paid trip,” said Kincaid. “They covered airfare, two nights in a hotel, meals for both me and my wife. It’s really amazing. I’ve never received any award of this magnitude before.”

Kincaid says he was nominated by Charles Helm, and while he knew that Helm was going to be nominating various people (including him), he had no idea of the magnitude of the award or that it was coming. “The first I knew about it was when I got an email from the Lieutenant Governor’s office saying that I’d been nominated by Dr Helm, and that the nomination had been approved.” He laughs. “About three or four days before I got the email, I had a phone call saying that I had won a million dollars. But this one seemed legitimate, and I was awestruck. I wasn’t anticipating anything like this. It’s a real honour.”

Kincaid says he is humbled by the award. “I recognize that none of us do this sort of work on our own. We’re backed up by all the other people who have done a lot of work on the way. It’s put out as a personal award, but it’s really for the entire group.

“It’s an honour that others in town are deserving of as well. There are folks around town that have done a lot of work around town that would be perfect, if someone would put their names in.”

The British Columbia Achievement Foundation is an independent foundation established and endowed by the province of B.C. to celebrate excellence in the arts, humanities, enterprise and community service. Launched in 2003, the B.C. Community Achievement Awards were the first initiative of the foundation, followed by the B.C. Creative Achievement Award for Applied Art and Design, B.C.’s National Award for Canadian Non- Fiction, the B.C. Creative Achievement Award for First Nations Art, and the B.C. Aboriginal Business Awards.

Kincaid says he appreciates the nomination by Helm, as well as all who supported it. “Charles put the form in, but a number of other people put in letters of support.”